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SWORD OF HONOR
22" x 30" Acrylic & Sumi Ink on watercolor paper
Original on loan, private collection

The “Sword of Honor” painting was created from reworking canvas and paper pieces. The orange and gold paint is the original brush work. The red and black movements were added years later, upside down of how the painting is viewed here.

Within the orange and red brush strokes I see an image of a woman, kneeling - head bowed as if being knighted. Upon seeing this image, instantly I heard a soft voice within say, sword of honor. Though the title was clear, I also knew the painting would not be finished this day. Frequently I pulled the piece out to study it and to listen for intuitive guidance of what it needed to be complete. Alas, months later and nearly forgotten in a stack of archived watercolor paintings, I glanced over the woman warrior image and gut instinct moved me to strike a single black brush mark, knowing this would call it finished.

Further contemplation of these brush markings prodded me to dialog with patrons and colleagues about their interpretations of it. Most viewed the single black brush stroke as a victorian black dress while others saw it as a modern outfit akin to a cocktail dress. Yet another spoke about how the woman becomes warrior-like as she seems to be stepping out of or leaving behind the societal demands of perfection, represented by the black dress.

This painting is a poignant personal metaphor that echoes a Biblical passage; Ephesians 6:10 - 18: taking on the full Armor of God. The shield of faith, the helmet of salvation and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God. And to stand firm against the powers of the dark world. I view the black brush mark as a metaphor of conformity, oppression, bound in stoic darkness. A totem of a walking dead life, now behind the woman. The red and orange brush markings represent a woman of strength with vitality, value, and integrity. I see her bowing on one knee in honor before the Creator, accepting her life of purpose - a woman of light bearing Armor of God; free to experience life and all the joy and sorrows that it offers, contrary to the stoic solitude of fear and non-expression.

2005

SWORD OF HONOR
22" x 30" Acrylic & Sumi Ink on watercolor paper
Original on loan, private collection

The “Sword of Honor” painting was created from reworking canvas and paper pieces. The orange and gold paint is the original brush work. The red and black movements were added years later, upside down of how the painting is viewed here.

Within the orange and red brush strokes I see an image of a woman, kneeling - head bowed as if being knighted. Upon seeing this image, instantly I heard a soft voice within say, sword of honor. Though the title was clear, I also knew the painting would not be finished this day. Frequently I pulled the piece out to study it and to listen for intuitive guidance of what it needed to be complete. Alas, months later and nearly forgotten in a stack of archived watercolor paintings, I glanced over the woman warrior image and gut instinct moved me to strike a single black brush mark, knowing this would call it finished.

Further contemplation of these brush markings prodded me to dialog with patrons and colleagues about their interpretations of it. Most viewed the single black brush stroke as a victorian black dress while others saw it as a modern outfit akin to a cocktail dress. Yet another spoke about how the woman becomes warrior-like as she seems to be stepping out of or leaving behind the societal demands of perfection, represented by the black dress.

This painting is a poignant personal metaphor that echoes a Biblical passage; Ephesians 6:10 - 18: taking on the full Armor of God. The shield of faith, the helmet of salvation and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God. And to stand firm against the powers of the dark world. I view the black brush mark as a metaphor of conformity, oppression, bound in stoic darkness. A totem of a walking dead life, now behind the woman. The red and orange brush markings represent a woman of strength with vitality, value, and integrity. I see her bowing on one knee in honor before the Creator, accepting her life of purpose - a woman of light bearing Armor of God; free to experience life and all the joy and sorrows that it offers, contrary to the stoic solitude of fear and non-expression.

2005